Designing good UX for old people

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“We’ll use your site, but first we have to trust you.”

http://uxmag.com/articles/simple-and-secure-sites-keep-boomers-happy

UX Mag offers quick tips on how to design appropriate web user experience for the growing Baby Boomer market.

Key takeaways:

  • Educate your Boomer user before asking them to dive in.
  • Be reassuring – remind them how secure your site is, offer a heads up of what sort of information they’ll be expected to give – be nice, hold their hand.
  • Clear, simple, fairly static design is best – give lots of margin for shaky-handed, tired-eyed error.
  • Big text
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When bad design happens to good content

A quick, short read on good practise for styling text:

And something more recent from Smashing that uses more big words:

Text tricks for when you cbf with design

The title is sort of misleading.

Making a site look good with just text is a form of design. And there are simple enough guidelines out there that we can easily take ‘programmer design’ to the next level.

http://ilovetypography.com/2008/02/28/a-guide-to-web-typography/

Tl;dr:

  • Maintain strong colour contrast that’s easy on the eyes
  • Consider text size for readability
  • Use text size, alignment, colour and style to show content hierarchy
  • Include whitespace and negative space to draw attention to your text

Design principles cheatsheet

A cheatsheet on design principles – good tidy summary of things to keep in mind when doing front-end stuff.

http://www.mendocino.edu/docs/graphics/design_principles.pdf

Admittedly, I’ve no context for this one. I was googling ‘eyeflow’ for some research and came across the PDF. Looks like it belongs a TAFE type of college.