Little niceties about MailChimp’s new logo

The MailChimp email newsletter company got a new logo recently – Creative Bloq explains the designer’s attention to detail.

Interesting read; it’s nice to be able to see what the pros see.

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Guidelines for website credibility

Handy copypasta guidelines from the wiki page on the Stanford Web Credibility Project:

Guideline Additional Comments
1. Make it easy to verify the accuracy of the information on your site. You can build web site credibility by providing third-party support (citations, references, source material) for information you present, especially if you link to this evidence. Even if people don’t follow these links, you’ve shown confidence in your material.
2. Show that there’s a real organization behind your site. Showing that your web site is for a legitimate organization will boost the site’s credibility. The easiest way to do this is by listing a physical address. Other features can also help, such as posting a photo of your offices or listing a membership with the chamber of commerce.
3. Highlight the expertise in your organization and in the content and services you provide. Do you have experts on your team? Are your contributors or service providers authorities? Be sure to give their credentials. Are you affiliated with a respected organization? Make that clear. Conversely, don’t link to outside sites that are not credible. Your site becomes less credible by association.
4. Show that honest and trustworthy people stand behind your site. The first part of this guideline is to show there are real people behind the site and in the organization. Next, find a way to convey their trustworthiness through images or text. For example, some sites post employee bios that tell about family or hobbies.
5. Make it easy to contact you. A simple way to boost your site’s credibility is by making your contact information clear: phone number, physical address, and email address.
6. Design your site so it looks professional (or is appropriate for your purpose). We find that people quickly evaluate a site by visual design alone. When designing your site, pay attention to layout, typography, images, consistency issues, and more. Of course, not all sites gain credibility by looking like IBM.com. The visual design should match the site’s purpose.
7. Make your site easy to use—and useful. We’re squeezing two guidelines into one here. Our research shows that sites win credibility points by being both easy to use and useful. Some site operators forget about users when they cater to their own company’s ego or try to show the dazzling things they can do with web technology.
8. Update your site’s content often (at least show it’s been reviewed recently). People assign more credibility to sites that show they have been recently updated or reviewed.
9. Use restraint with any promotional content (e.g., ads, offers). If possible, avoid having ads on your site. If you must have ads, clearly distinguish the sponsored content from your own. Avoid pop-up ads, unless you don’t mind annoying users and losing credibility. As for writing style, try to be clear, direct, and sincere.
10. Avoid errors of all types, no matter how small they seem. Typographical errors and broken links hurt a site’s credibility more than most people imagine. It’s also important to keep your site up and running.

 

We need to be very careful when talking about contexts.

We need to be very careful when talking about contexts — design decisions related to context must be based on fact rather than assumption. For example, a context-based assumption would be to change the language of a Web page in response to the location of a device — a terrible idea because the reader might speak a language that isn’t native to the detected country.

Source: Responsible Considerations for Responsive Web Design via @smashingmag

Solving health problems through good design

Highlights:

Design is the beauty of using constraints as advantages.

It’s one of the most haunting phrases in all of the human condition: ‘If only we had known, then maybe we could have done something about it.’ But of course, we couldn’t have known. Health happens in between doctor visits and the doctor isn’t there to get all of this data.

But for the first time in history, we have these things that sit in our pockets – they’re supercomputers[…] And we can start to tackle the problem of ‘if only we had known.’

22% of Americans never finish their antibiotics course. That’s despite knowing the hundreds of millions of dollars that the US has spent convincing people that they’re creating superbugs, that they’re not getting better.

So here’s the question – is it people’s fault, or is it the fault of the design of our intervention?

If it was a patch you put on yourself and it fell off after the right amount of time, forgetting wouldn’t even be a thing. We have to be designing our interventions to work the way people do, and people are highly constrained.

An indicator has a value when it’s indicating something.

An indicator has a value when it’s indicating something. But if it’s not indicating something, it shouldn’t be there.

It’s one of those funny things – you spend so much more time to make it less conspicuous and less obvious. And if you think about it, so many of the products that we’re surrounded by – they want you to be very aware of just how clever the solution was.

When the indicator comes on, I wouldn’t expect anybody to point to that as a feature, but at some level, I think you’re aware of a calm and considered solution that therefore speaks about how you’re gonna use it. Not the terrible struggles we as designers and engineers had in trying to solve some of the problems.

Source: OBJECTIFIED (Film Clip #1)

via Hack Design

6 ways to make your website tablet-friendly

A checklist of simple things from UX Magazine:

When a website exhibits “tappiness,” it’s easy—or even delightful—to use on a mobile or tablet device. Tappiness encompasses smart use of space, text that is easy to read, logical interaction clues, and large touch targets that allow visitors to navigate with confidence.

Read: The Pursuit of Tappiness

Tl;dr:

  • Bigger buttons with more whitespace around them.
  • Make links more obvious, without relying on hover states.
  • Bigger font sizes.
  • More padding in nav menus (to create bigger hitboxes).
  • Greater margin, padding and line-heights for better readability.
  • Bigger form fields with more whitespace around them.

Honour your trolls

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Honour your trolls with the credit they deserve.

When a comment is marked as trolling, the comment appears in Comic Sans, lighter color and has a troll face next to the comment author.

via Little Big Details, which is an awesome blog full of cool ux things.

Thanks, @davempalmer, for the link!

Good design is good business

Long article is long:

Interesting points for those who cbf reading:

Apple’s rise offers a few important lessons about today’s connection between design and business. The easiest is that design allows you to stoke consumer lust–and demand higher prices as a result.

You might wonder what design can possibly have to do with the success of a jet engine or an MRI machine. But hospitals and power plants are now linking their machines into ecosystems. And well-designed iPad apps are the simplest way to manage them.

If [the designers] do their job right, the result–a working ecosystem–is a far better platform for innovation than an isolated product. Just think about Apple and how its products have expanded from iMacs to iPods, iTunes, iPhones, and iPads, all linked via its iCloud.

Good designs seldom stay good for very long if they must navigate a gauntlet of corporate approval. That’s because the design process is as much reductive as anything else–figuring what can be simplified and taken out. Corporate approvals are usually about adding things on to appease internal overseers. When something has been approved by everyone, it may be loved by none. Just look at what happened to Microsoft in the 2000s and how only now is it trying to redefine itself by building a more design-driven culture.

[N]otice what unites Pinterest and Microsoft: Ultimately, each company’s success hinges upon how well it intuits what users want and how much each pleases them with products. Only design has that power to seduce and delight.

Now here is a beautifully designed cat. Happy Monday!

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Img sauce.

Design is design

A conversation with a long-standing, well-known, old-school designer about how design is design, regardless of medium.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SG0Ou07IDhQ

My favourite quotes:

“Yes, web designers work like print designers. They look at the issue, they look at the client, they look at the brief, the circumstances, the user – they don’t have to keep looking at the technology anymore. But ultimately, we always had our constraints. I had to cut paper. With glue, for christ’s sakes.”

“If you design a typeface, it’s very much like writing a pop song. You can’t stop anybody singing it in their bathroom out of tune.”

Thanks, @dos4gw for the link!