How users hold their mobile devices

HoldPhones_Figure-1

Voice calls occupied 22% of the users, while 18.9% were engaged in passive activities—most listening to audio and some watching a video. We considered interactions to be voice calls only if users were holding their phone to their ear, so we undoubtedly counted some calls as apparent passive use.

The users who we observed touching their phone’s screens or buttons held their phones in three basic ways:

  • one handed—49%
  • cradled—36%
  • two handed—15%

While most of the people that we observed touching their screen used one hand, very large numbers also used other methods. Even the least-used case, two-handed use, is large enough that you should consider it during design.

Read the full article at UXmatters: How Do Users Really Hold Mobile Devices?

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Your website has two faces – one talks to humans, one talks to machines

When a user interface—intended for human consumption—reflects too much of a system’s internals in its design and language, it’s likely to confuse the people who use it. But at the same time, if data doesn’t conform to a specific structure, it’s likely to confuse the machines that need to use it—so we can’t ignore system requirements, either.

People and machines parse information in fundamentally different ways. We need to find a way to balance the needs of both.

Read more: Your Website has Two Faces at ALA

Solving health problems through good design

Highlights:

Design is the beauty of using constraints as advantages.

It’s one of the most haunting phrases in all of the human condition: ‘If only we had known, then maybe we could have done something about it.’ But of course, we couldn’t have known. Health happens in between doctor visits and the doctor isn’t there to get all of this data.

But for the first time in history, we have these things that sit in our pockets – they’re supercomputers[…] And we can start to tackle the problem of ‘if only we had known.’

22% of Americans never finish their antibiotics course. That’s despite knowing the hundreds of millions of dollars that the US has spent convincing people that they’re creating superbugs, that they’re not getting better.

So here’s the question – is it people’s fault, or is it the fault of the design of our intervention?

If it was a patch you put on yourself and it fell off after the right amount of time, forgetting wouldn’t even be a thing. We have to be designing our interventions to work the way people do, and people are highly constrained.